SUMMER 2024

A LITTLE ROMANCE: ROMANCE LANGUAGES, BRIEFLY (1 CR)
01:991:101:G1:04418
REMOTE ASYNCHRONOUS; 7/8-7/19
THOMAS STEPHENS

This course introduces students to a lesser-known or lesser-spoken set of Romance languages. Via videos & short readings the class will treat each of these Romance languages & their subvarieties individually & comparatively to explain the notion of their derivation from a diasystem interconnected at the linguistic, aesthetic, cultural, literary, & historical levels. Students will also learn about language maintenance & related efforts. Taught in English.

SPANISH FOR TRAVEL (1 CR)
01:991:110:A1:05480
MW 10:00-12:00PM, AB-2200

05/28-06/21

This course is designed for students with no prior knowledge of Spanish who are interested in acquiring and improving basic communication skills in Spanish. These skills will include the acquisition of culture-specific tips that will be useful for their study-abroad stay or travel to a Spanish-speaking country. Students practice spoken Spanish in a variety of contexts and develop communicative tactics and vocabulary to improve oral expression and conversation. No prior knowledge of Spanish required. Taught in Spanish.


CANTONESE FOR TRAVEL I (1 CR)
01:991:110:A6:05778
ONLINE; M 6:00-7:50PM and Asynchronous content

05/28-06/21
JANE HUANG

This course is designed for students interested in acquiring basic communication skills in Cantonese. The course focuses on developing basic oral and aural skills; students will be exposed to but not expected to learn written Cantonese. Students will learn to greet others, introduce themselves, order at a restaurant, conduct simple transactions at stores, and use public transportation to get around. In addition to the language skills, students will learn about local culture and customs through multimedia course materials. No prior knowledge of Cantonese required. Taught in Cantonese.


CANTONESE FOR TRAVEL II (1 CR)
01:991:110:A7:05779
ONLINE; TH 6:00-7:50PM and Asynchronous content
05/28-06/21
JANE HUANG

This level 2 Cantonese for Travel course is designed for students interested in acquiring basic communication skills in Cantonese—one of the major Chinese dialects and the dominant dialect spoken by the Chinese diaspora globally. The course focuses on developing basic oral and aural skills; students will be exposed to but not expected to learn written Cantonese. The conversations are set in scenarios students will encounter during study-abroad stays or travels to Hong Kong and other Cantonese-speaking regions of China. Students will learn to conduct simple transactions at stores, use public transportation to get around, describe the weather, make simple medical consultations, and exchange traveling information. In addition to language skills, students will learn about local culture and customs through multimedia course materials. While Cantonese for Travel I is not a prerequisite but rather a recommendation, minimum knowledge of Cantonese is required. Taught in Cantonese.

ENDANGERED LANGUAGES (1 CR)
01:991:111:A1:03139
REMOTE ASYNCHRONOUS; 5/28-6/10
CHARLES G. HÄBERL

The vast majority of human knowledge is stored not in books, or computers, or even Wikipedia, but rather in the minds of ordinary people the world around. In many cases, the languages in which this knowledge is encoded are spoken by as few as a dozen people, and will almost certainly be lost with the passing of these languages and their speakers. By some estimates, fully 90% or more of the world’s languages will have disappeared by the end of the century. This module will employ a multidisciplinary approach to address the impending disappearance of the world’s linguistic and cultural patrimony, which is one of the greatest challenges facing mankind in the 21st century.

Over the course of the semester, your objectives will be to investigate:

  • the importance of linguistic diversity, and the ways in which the cultural knowledge encoded within language shape our experiences of and perspectives on the world;
  • issues of language policy and linguistic rights across local and global contexts; and
  • the methodology and technology of documentary linguistics, and how it can be employed to document our disappearing linguistic and cultural patrimony.

Over the course of two weeks, students will be introduced to “local” non-standard forms of language, and the critical threat to intellectual diversity posed by their disappearance, as well as the philosophical and other theoretical issues surrounding the topic of language endangerment, such as the importance of traditionally orally-transmitted knowledge, both as witnesses to a specific tradition and more broadly within the context of human knowledge, and the importance of documenting these before the languages in which they are transmitted vanish. Taught in English.